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20121209
20121209
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of eastern europe now has flat tax is. in all these countries, revenues have boomed. there hasn't been a big craze this is anime and estonia. this in a past and estonia with 12% flat tax. the fact is supply-side economics is booming around the world. it's only in the united states that soul-searching and from this economics of enterprise. >> what is your analysis of what is happening in what donald rumsfeld recalled old europe? >> old europe is fallen with the indulgent dilutions of the welfare state. they've all accepted dependence on a show i've government and bass have destroyed the value of their assets. when you destroy the value of your assets, ultimately the human beings who make your economy go our investments and creations of work after. when you'd appreciate this asset, reliability is become impossible. if you unleashed the assets of your economy, allows the stock market to boom and thread began, then all of a sudden these liabilities they seem impossible today become manageable in the future. >> george gilder, when you see the fight in congress over the debt ceiling or tax breaks
the region is in for a long. of time of change the central or eastern europe -- long period of time of change than central or eastern europe faced. the main argument is, it is upon us, and more change is coming. some of that will include islamist forces and the need to figure out how to best use our power to shape and influence their transition. >> on to rob. >> a couple of closing points. first, generally we tend to project exceed a certain bigotry of low expectations on muslims in the arab cultural world. those of us who are various religious faiths here know the extent to which we practice our faith is and how faithful we are to this or that religious prescription. we know that we fall pretty short, but we think, muslims all pray five times a day, they never touched a scotch. they all do every commandment in islam. and they submit to the will of their local imam, et cetera. it does not work that way. moslem practice in general is not so different than general practice here. muslims want the political the way that we want to be political. let us not fall prey to the bigotry of low expectati
. if the u.s. economy has two% less growth, it will probably be a 1% less growth in mexico, canada, in europe, and japan. there will be ripple effects. >> are you worried about this? >> yes. of course i worry about it. the u.s. is a big chunk of the global economy. it has often been a driver of growth. to have that large player virtually shut in a recession would be bad news for the rest of the world. we do not think that's at the moment. we do not want to have this effect on a french our recovery. >> what would your message be to members of both parties on capitol hill and to the white house? >> i would say focus on the real issues. the real issues are the united states and its leadership role in the world. the u.s. has an economic leadership in the world. to protect that and make sure that that leadership in tourist, the uncertainty has to be removed. if you are speaking from a strong position because you have dealt with your own issues, then you can advise, help, and encourage. but if you speak from a week position, it is more difficult. >> you have warned about the risks of playing politi
on that project, the making of a global capitalism and then even as it helps europe and japan revive, the question is, how does is keep reducing? because now you're creating your own competitors. >> at one point in your book to speak but the american empire, actually dramatic appoints. tucker added as imperialism by invitation. you want to talk to the lead of such a mean by that. >> it's actually a phrase that a sweet story and used for 1945. but it is largely not -- it's a matter of saying that the pentagon in the cna have, in fact, not been essential to the role the american state has played in the world as the treasury and the federal reserve have been. and that term empire which was coined for the way in which decapolis class of europe after 1945 facing strongly and much more concerning labour movements , the socialist threat that they posed, and they were concerned about a soviet invasion. turn to the american state to look to the american state to reconstruct a capitalistic. and in that sense it was empire building. when multinational corporations, the conditions by the late 1950's were foun
rating. i've warned you over and over about the economic storm headed our way partly because of europe and this fiscal lif, but i've also told you about an american economic renaissance that could be just ahead. just beyond the storm clouds. the fiscal cliff is fixable, but every day washington fails to make a deal, more damage is being doing. john king, ken rogoff and diane swan, chief economist at mezaro financial. john, right now, this is more politics than the economy. some people are saying don't sweat it. the threat of going over the fiscal cliff is overblown. it will get done. an 11th hour deal. john, as you read the politics at play, what do you see? >> i see both sides digging in. you've just played the president saying i want that rate hike. the republicans are saying mr. president, we'll give you the revenues, but not through a rate hike, but the president believes he won the election and he's upped the ante. says he wants twice as much in tax revenues than a year and a half ago, so the president believes he has the higher ground. i think maybe the democrats have a deeper tr
-hour drive over the mountains and down into europe's fun-in-the-sun headquarters, the costa del sol. i find this strip of mediterranean coastline generally overbuilt and very commercialized. malaga, the major city of the coast, is a good place to pass through. and almost anything even resembling a quaint fishing village is long gone, replaced by time-share condos and golf courses. the big draw is the beaches. there are plenty of hotels, and sun worshipers enjoy themselves in spite of the congestion and lack of charm or local culture. nearly every country from europe's drizzly north tucks an expatriate community somewhere along this coast. they don't want to leave their culture, just their weather. my favorite costa del sol stop is the resort town of nerja. while capitalizing on the holiday culture, nerja has retained some of its charm. the church fronts the square, which fronts the beach, and everybody's out strolling, eventually winding up on the proud "balcony of europe" terrace. this bluff, jutting jauntily into the sea, overlooks miles of coastline. a castle occupied this spot for centu
to happen in europe, and we don't know what's going to happen in greece and we don't know what's going to have in the euro zone and the energy needs in china and india and industrialized nations. what do you think is the biggest threat from the outside to the u.s. economy? >> the fiscal cliff. first of all i think there are issues that are beginning to improve and, you know, whether you look at the euro zone which is making progress, gradually, laboriously and certainly improving and with good numbers because if you look at thinge ia because if you look at thinge a greg gat euro zone debt, and you have political stability back now that the new team is in place so the volatility and the instability factors that are outside have reduced. the real threat that we have at the moment is really here with us and that can be addressed. >> but when you look at, i mean i understood that the european banks had sort of downsized or downgraded what they thought would be growth. you've got more than 11% unemployment in the euro zone, which is a good deal higher than here. >> yeah yeah. >> are those
in all over north america and europe and africa and really we have got wishes coming in from almost every country in the world now. and people are just expressing, all kinds of amazing hopes and dreams for the future of the world which is really encouraging for us. we create the tree as a symbol of the global unity and hope. and we are going to continue to add wishes to the tree all through the month of december. so we would love for you to go to our website which is rainbow fund.org and it is free and we will printout your wish on a piece of paper and fold it into a crane and put it up on the tree. now, i want to thank, some key people who helped with this year's tree. first i want to start off with our core team, our core creative team and that consists of karin kai and linda mihara and thank you they have been working on the tree for seven years. >> and this year we have the help of dozens of volunteers and i want to particularly acknowledge the university of berkeley alfa, fi omega service community and volunteers from one brick. aid for good, the san francisco chapter. and you guys a
reports on in europe and their work rules. from london, what do they get that we don't? >> european workers have the right to and protection of gainful unemployment. the minimum guaranteed staycation is 20 days paid not including weekend, additional time off , holidays. at france it starts at 25 per good european court of justice added on another to give a workers the right to to a vacation to over or give back. >> for instance it used the for two weeks for your christmas holiday and use brain drain gold and the last eight-- you are laid up that means they automatically go into your sickly youth then you could have the vacation do over to make up for those days that you weren't that sec or hurt. john: if you say i have they cold? they have to give you that back? >> if it is dead doctor's note to to say she got the sniffles so she will need another seven days of paid vacation. john: italy first. if you start a business and keep it small, up that 10 workers you have some flexibility but number 11 1/2 to have the self assessment outlying every possible health and safety hazard? >> yes.
snowfall has blanketed much of europe the snow has already caused a few headaches. flights have been canceled and delayed in cities such as paris and amsterdam. last weekend, heavy snow in russia shut down a major highway leaving drivers stranded. europe has more snow in the forecast. i was just in washington d.c. it was blue skies. and a sunny skies. >> it is still december. >> and time flies when you're having fun. >> it is going to be gorgeous with temperatures in the 60s. 63 degrees in san francisco, san jose. fremont. mid-60s, concord. and we do have some rainfall on the way but we will wait a little bit with light rain. with much cooler expected. >> perfect for the season. >> correct. >> that is it for us will see you at 11 (music)
around the globe, europe is in a terrible recession. they have huge debt problems. you have bigger problems in asia than you thought we would have a. ande can get this one right actually make a real road to bring in new revenue and reduce our costs so that we bring our budget into balance, i think it is a huge opportunity for economic revival in america that around the globe will make us proud and create jobs. it is tough. if the president gets its right, we have a huge ability to see an economic revival we have all been waiting for. >> let me follow up on a ci. specific point. you said earlier that indicating it should be up to states to tailor programs when it comes to implementing certain aspects of obamacare. should states have this flexibility? flexibility? >>
a dozen people have been killed, more than 60 wounded. >> as unrest in other parts of the world, europe, in spain, a developing conflict over medical workers. they're taking to the streets to protest budgets cuts and plans to privatize hospitals in spain. thousands of demonstrators marched through madrid. critics say it would dismental spain's healthcare system but the government says cuts are necessary to secure health services during the recession. >>> the countdown continues. at this point there's just over three weeks until our nation potentially tumbles over what we call the fiscal cliff. john boehner says there's been no real progress in the negotiations between the white house and lawmakers on capitol hill. now he's accusing president obama of dragging his feet as the deadline looms. is more of the same in store for the week ahead? joining us, managing edit for of the hill. >> good morning. >> we talk about this happening and going over the cliff. speaker boehner accuses the white house of dragging its feet. >> president obama offered a proposal, republicans didn't like that plan
, from europe when they are looking on the interpret what to do, in san francisco for christmas. we have people that will be there this year for their 20th year along with me. >> and you have headliners, too. >> there are four of us. we started in 1993. and in 1997 with penny youngman. that was the last show with him. and eight shows over the course of four days since 1997. we have had david brenner, shelly berman, this year judy gold. >> hasn't she been here before? >> she has been on the show before. >> it is coming back? >> some people have performed more than once. >> you perform every year? >> i do. >> you juggle everything. >> i do everything but cook! i do the pr, i oversee the design of the program and the postcards and the website and most of the comics. jews aren't supposed to eat pork but there is a clause in the torah that said if it is wrapped up in a wonton it is okay for everybody. i came out of the closet and said mom and dad, i joined jews for jesus! they said we raced you to be jewish. how could you do this to us when we raise you in the jewish faith. i said i am kid
, it is the most vulnerable who are the victims, which we are seeing in europe. many feel they have nowhere to turn. we must never let that happen here. and election has come and gone. the people have made their choice. policy-makers still have a duty to choose between ideas that work and those that do not. when one economic policy after another has failed our working families, it is no answer to expressed compassion for them or create government programs that offer promise but do not create reforms. we must come together to advance new strategies for the the people out of poverty. let's go with what works. looking around this room at the men and women who are carrying on jack kemp's legacy, i know we are answering the call. this cause is right. jack kemp started this. we know the good fight for the american ideal wood -- will go on until we reach all people. thank you for coming in here this evening. thank you for having us this night. congratulations to marco. [applause] >> now senator marco rubio was honoree he discussed policy recommendations he believes that will help all families regardless o
been critical to the passage through europe. whatever the private feelings. they saved their criticism for french in to china. where they claimed to encounter racism on parallel. they routinely stayed at branches of the ymca, the equivalent for the grown men of boy scouts and cheered on by enclaves of indians who instituted the south asian over most of the globe. a consequence empire and kind of -- a different and similar manifestation of internationalism supported them in this clutch of circumnavigators. the international and support him on the later surfaced tour of the world. he came from a privileged russian family. that was of no help when he found himself on the losing side in the russian civil war during that revolution. as a white russian stranded stranded in china he was a man without a country. so destitute he made his way to shanghai, overhand and a mix of men and women in cast off slothing. he obtained a passport. a document that the league of nations had begun to issue to stateless refugees initially russians in 1922, a first step in the development of international refuge
deduction will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenue. half of that would come through tax reform and the
people born into bondage and server to today and the victim of sex trafficking in western europe sold for $10 or more. these are the averages. the immediate economic consequence of this depreciation and cost is an increase in return on investment. particularly when tied to the fact you can exploit people in dozens of injuries. in the old law, roughly 20% average annual return on investment. today, 300% sein or more. but sex trafficking, it is more than that -- today, 300% or more. with sex trafficking, it is more than that. today, it could be a year or a couple of years. it is much shorter. centuries ago, you could legally own human beings. today you cannot actually legally own human beings. but people tend to exact the same kind of exploitation regardless. i have already used a lot of terms and had not really told you what they mean. the reason for that is some of these terms, most of them remain unclear. there is debate whether you talk to prosecutors, law enforcement, people in the international arena, as to what slavery means and forced labor and him and trafficking. it depends on
on "wall street journal" reporter who reports on in europe and their work rules. from london, what do they get that we don't? >> european workers have the right to and protection of gainful unemployment. the minimum guaraned staycation is 20 days paid not including weekend, additional time off , holidays. at france it starts at 25 per good european court of stice added on another to give a workers the right to to a vacation to over or give back. >> for instanceused the for two weeks for your christmas holiday and use brain drain goldnd the last eight-- you are laid up that means they automatically go into your sickly youth then you could have the vacatiodo over to make up for those days tha you weren't that sec or hurt. john: if you say i have they cold? they have to give you that back? >> if it is dead doctor's note too say she got the sniffles so she will need another sen days of paid vacation. john: italy first. if you start a business and keep it small, up that 10 workers you have some flexibility but number 11 1/2 to have the self assessment outlying every possible health and saf
the economy and making the german economy the strongest in europe and it's the -- it basically is a policy that pays the homeowners so it makes investing in solar attractive to homeowners. right now it's not attractive to put a hundred solar panels on your roof, but under this policy germany has made tremendous advances. there is one country in the world that is 100% solar power as of last month. cca cannot possibly do what they need done. the word -- you can boil this whole argument down to one question, one word and that is "inevitability". we are running out of the oil. we are drowning in our own waste. we need to stop burning oil and the way you could do it is putting a couple hundred solar panels on each house in san francisco. this was indirectly mentioned in the guardian editorial but they don't say it and it's because they don't understand it. it's important to understand what being done in germany and other countries around the world because by doing this they're creating a massive cash flow to homeowners in these countries and it's an investment that the homeowners are gl
and europe are crashing on our shores? >> they are dumping product by having government subsidies to chien needs products that are often then subsidized so they can put you guys out of business on the entire market. that's what a lot of americans don't understand. it's frustrating to me. >> there is probably an even more important point about the product that is that our own government is making it more difficult for us to compete. >> how are they doing that? >> president obama is making the rounds. he is going to help us out by increasing our taxes. the only way we can beat governor is by investing in equipment. if the wage rates are lower in china and steel costs the same electricity costs the same the only way i can make business is to have better gimeequipment ane only way to have better equipment is to continually investment the only way to continually invest is make a profit. we are unable to invest in equipment capital accumulation increases wage growth decreases. >> there are a lot of big businesses that do okay. corporations are taxes at all. finding ways to be multi national. the
. >> they were comfortable, yes. >> what inspired rob cox two, six months before, go off to europe? >> well, this is one of the questions that fascinate me when i started researching the book. he was an idealistic young man. i knew that. he went to a school that, a christian school, and he was somewhat religious and felt that life was meant to be at more than just yourself, and to have meaning and be helpful to others, that kind of thing. there were a few less noble motivations i think. he was graduated from college. he had no other obvious plan, and yet what we would now call a low draft number. he knew that it was a good chance you'll be drafted drafted into the american army, which had resumed the draft in come at the end of 1940. but had no clear plans to actually go to war, and he wasn't too excited i don't think about spending the next couple of years training for military. so he was casting around for something, and i think this fulfill a lot of meaningful, fulfilled a lot of meaningful goals for him. >> how did he get from harvard to england? i mean, who did he contact? >> that's a
challenging. >> schieffer: i know europe a coffee drinker. have you been able to drink coffee? >> no, i'm thoroughly uncalfinated right now. and it's a terrible state of human existence. i don't see how people do it. look, this has been a difficulty for me for just one week but it's a reality for americans for months at a time. i have a social media platform called waywire, where people are posting their own experiences on this, which-- and a really amazing testimony from americans. this is a daily reality. so in this time in our country where we see a decoupling between economic growth creating wealth for some but a real decoupling as wages decline. you have families whose wage wages have frozen or dropping, still working the same amount of hours, working 22 jobs and still find themselves dependent on programs like food stamps and snap, and if we cut these programs we cast them into food insecurity, which does have a long-term deleterious effect on our economy, especially as we send kids to school nutritionally unfit to learn and military families who sacrifice so much for us and veter
right now, europe the in a terrible recession. you've got huge problems or bigger problems in asia than we thought we were going to have. if we can get this right in the first half of the year, i don't think it will happen before the end of the you near. if we can do this right, we can bring in more revenue and reduce our costs and reduce what we're paying out to bring our debt into balance. i think it is a huge tunts for america that around the globe will make us proud and crealt jobs. it is tough but it is an opportunity and if the president gets it right, chi believe he will, we have a huge ability to see and acknowledge that revival that we've been waiting for. >> let me follow-up on the specific point on the affordable care act. this letter sentsdz by a republican governor. many of these ideas and combha that is what the republican governors said, indicating it should be up to the states to taylor their programs when it comes to implementing the affordable care otherwise known as the obamacare. should states have the flexibility? >> yes, that is what the president has said within r
been 10 japan still fully with europe and the lesson here is how we let the excess of the housing and member those days you talk about the property around the imperial palace in tokyo? 200 acres was equal to all real-estate of california. that was very old school to talk about it. >> when you talk to fed officials. >> i am off the record. [laughter] >> host: but not now. you have a microphone. [laughter] but when i do the rio the frustration of the criticism there easing too much to say that is the only course of action in the face of a political class not doing much. >> they get it both directions but if you think you can it you are right they have a lot of criticism last few days from the emerging countries that somehow the measures the federal reserve is undermining the prospects for the developing world. we have a responsibility. but i don't understand. it is pretty wild with the causes and the fact and chairman bernanke said the other day that they aim for a policy that in the long run will help everybody. that is the tricky part. >> the lead bidder not, it sounds nice. you d
return to europe for inspiration and guidance for fiscal policy, taking greece, perhaps, as a standard for dealing with econic a budget crises. the speaker did a charge the president is slow walking the nation to the brink of a fiscal cliff. that is one of the speakers firmest in the strongest statements yet. >> this is in a progress report because there is no progress to report. the white house has wasted another week. there are a lot of things that are possible to put the revenue on the table, but none of it is going to be possible. the president insists on his position. insists on my way or the highway. lou: inconveniently the congressional budget office today reported that the federal deficit is already bulging. the cbo reports for the first two months of fiscal 2013 that number $2902,000,000,000, $57 billion more than the same two month time span last year. and the labor department today report the unemployment rate fell to the 77%. good news, the lowest jobless rate in four years. the lower unemployment rate, however, the consequence of the more han 300,000 people who dropped ou
in europe. but, the consequences would be relatively minor. it is more exposed to it's own difficulties, and it's own issues, than to what happens elsewhere in the world, because it is such a large player. >> so we're our own 5,000 pound gor ri gorilla. >> let me ask you as a final question, january 2nd arrives, no deal, what will we notice first? >> lack of citizen, markets would react very quickly, and it would react in the stock market really taking a hit. i would say it will depend on what's on the horizon. the debt ceiling, and the long-term deficit and debt levels, that would be different. >> so that plan, even if it's a little late, would, you think, be better -- >> better comprehensive fix. >> thank you for joining us. >> when we return, the perils of doing nothing. >> reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> this is the same republican leadership that had the house and senate in session barely a day. i gave birth to my daughter on may 18th, five days later, i had a massive heart atta
of europe. >> also blizzard-like conditions in the northern part of our country but here, steamy out there. areas of fog. details coming up on the forecast. look grandma, they have a hobbit menu. i know. apparently, they based an entire movie off of it. try the all-new hobbit inspired menu, only at denny's. and see "the hobbit: an unexpected journey." >> blizzards and high winds have paralyzed many areas of croatia. in poland, some cities froze under temperatures of minus two degrees. more frigid nights and snowfall are expected in the next few days. in venice, the gondolas are covered in snow. temperatures have plunged across northern and central italy and snow has blanketed switzerland. serbians are struggling with brutal weather as residents cross snow covered streets and cars try to maneuver slippery roads. >> in our 11 insta-weather plus forecast with ava marie. >> what a different story here as we're seeing rainfall across the metro area. a live look from skycam right now. it was foggy earlier on and the rain has picked up, helping clear the fog. you can see the rain drops on the cam
with the challenges in europe, with china going through a transition, with india's political system, as chair of the india caucus, almost more dysfunctional than ours. we look pretty darn good if we can put a real plan in place. >> what would be the size of the plan? >> i think it gets north of $4 trillion, whether it gets to $6 trillion. this goes back to where you start. two points -- kind of on the opening round questions. it is important to remember that the simpson-bowles plan, which has gained a lot of attention, or the gang of six, which is built off the simpson-bowles, the presumptions that went into those plans assumed that all the top rates would go back up. when you start from that, even though i think simpson-bowles's idea that he would bring the rates down to the high 20's is a bit of a stretch. i do not think we will see that kind of across the board almost zeroing out in some places of tax expenditures that would require. they can show a path towards meaningful tax reform even with the rates at the higher level. point two, and this is one of the things where i think those of us
kingdom. i believe he owns media in eastern europe. i think this is a pretty dangerous trend. you know, the bottom line is that when you have a situation like that, it really influences not just what the american people think and feel, how they vote, but the issues that the united states congress deal with every day. let me give you an example, all right? is deficit reduction a serious issue? it is. i'm in the middle of that debate right now. but you know what is a more serious issue according to the american people? the need to create millions and millions of jobs. now how often are you turning on tv and saying, "hey, we're in the middle of a terrible recession. it is, we have 15% real unemployment or underemployment in america. we've got to create millions of jobs." that's what working people are saying, but the big money interests are saying, "oh, we've got to cut social security. we've got to cut medicare. we've got to cut medicaid." there is no other option. so i give you that just as an example of how corporate media throws out one set of ideas, where the american people are thin
. everybody that works in the airline industry watch that is movie. i was flying in europe on another airline. and the pilot -- it was a really big plane that has extra seats in the cockpit. before we took off, one of the pilots came out and said, come with me. and i went into the cockpit. they strapped me in and they took off and they said, we can tell everybody that we flew with murdoch. i was like, what? did that actually happen? >> what's taller? you or the statue? >> the statue is taller. and it's taller than every other statue. i'm closest to the street. so people will see my statue first. >> what is it like seven feet tall? >> 17 feet tall. i'm thrilled with it. it's an acknowledgment of what i achieved. >> what prompted you to write a children's book? >> i had an issue with the fact that so many kids, especially inner city kids, don't think they can be a success unless they're involved in sports or entertainment. you take a young man growing up in harlem or south side of chicago or here in atlanta, he wants to be jay-z, he wants to be lebron james, denzel washington. and he doesn't re
the coast of georgia and battles in canada and western europe, all over the place but again the majority of battles are fought here. the really interesting thing to me is that most of the battles fought here, the big battles are lost, they are losses and the really incredible achievements, logistical achievements are migration. so that is probably the number one reason that we don't celebrate this area in full force. >> the other extraordinary thing you say is 8000 rebels were killed in action. 11,000 died in the prison ships. most of those are in new york. one ship has 7000. >> i think a total of the two prison ships that are off now the brooklyn navy yard two prison ships had something at 11,000 people that died on them. again they are not the people who you would necessarily build a giant memorial singularly. those prison ships, washington protests them all through the war. the people on the ships, they were not being fed and they were dying on the ships. if you were an officer or you had some money, but if you are neither of those things, then you died on them. the thing is, after th
into bondage and servitude today. you can have a victim of sex trafficking in western europe. the immediate economic consequence of this, appreciation and cost, it is an increase in return on investment, particularly when tied to the fact that you can exploit people in dozens of industries. the old world, calculated, roughly 15% or 20% return on investment. today, 300% or 400%. it might be well beyond that. the duration of exploitation has changed. because of a large capital investments and the slow return, you could maintain and exploit people across the lifetimes. today, six months, one year, a couple years, it is much shorter. of course, very importantly, centuries ago, you could legally own human being is. today, you cannot actually legally own human believe -- beings. i have already used a lot of terms, slavery, human trafficking, and i have not told you what they mean. the reason for that is that some of these terms, most of these terms remain unclear. there's a lot of debate whether you talk to prosecutors, law enforcement, people in the international arena as to what slavery means.
or less broke down and was bottled up. and then he went across by train to europe, and took command of the css alabama in the summer of 1862. got it out through all kinds of hocus-pocus, and pulling the wool over the eyes of the british and so on and so forth. some of them wanted the wool pulled over their eyes so the ship could escape, and then commanded it for the next two years on the high seas. as i said earlier, it captured or destroyed 64 american merchant ships, intel ran up against the uss kearsarge outside cherbourg harbor june 1864 and was sunk. >> just one thing, because we're out of time wrote it i did want to say one thing which is always interested me. to think. one is that when the alabama confronts the kearsarge and the kearsarge prevails, talk about, you said earlier, these guys are sticklers for process and for what they learned enough from figures. he says the kearsarge was an iron clad, it was unfair. is because of the chain mail that the kearsarge had over its deck to enter which was more time to discuss this particular occasion. we would have to go, because, be
the united states, england and europe. and so the president ordered them built in 1940, but the navy, um, decided that that was probably not a good idea. so they convinced the president that the scarce resources that were available at that time would be better spent on destroyers. and i think that if you look at the historical record, you'll see that that probably was a mistake. the destroyer escort is sort of a novel type of vessel. it's smaller than a destroyer, um, around 300 feet. and it had a shorter turning radius so that it could, it could essentially turn on a dime compared to a destroyer. so what they did is they escorted the convoys across the atlantic, and the convoys consisted of troop ships and supply ships for the war effort. but if they, if they made contact with a u-boat, they could break off, and then they could pursue that u-boat. when you look at the record, though, i mean, 70 u-boats, they probably were, without question, the most successful antisubmarine vessel in the fleet. this ship is the uss slater. it was built in the tampa shipyard. there were 563 destroyer esc
. the two sons traveled all over the world, including to america, across europe and asia. and ultimately it came to no avail. .. >> it was 20 years after a very bloody partition, and it was a time in government that was a time of great possibility. the country's first constitution was written in 1973. the last land reform you had done were carried out in that period. you had an incredibly progressive government. i just came from england doing a talk there, and it was in the 1970s that marital rape or earlier was considered a crime, but it was something, like, 1984 before the united king dome deemed marital rape a crime. there was a progressive period, not to say it was without fault. certainly, it was made, errors made, grievance ones, in his time. there was the first ever islamic conference, and it was a source of great pride for pakistanis, and they were asked to open up their homes for delegates combing from all over the world, open their home, and make space for them. they had to open their homes because many came uninvited, and there was a substantial entourage that required more sp
and -- off the coast of georgia and panels in canada, and in the -- battle some western europe's, but the majority of battles are fought here. the interesting, the really interesting thing to me is that most of the battles fought here, the big battles are lost, losses the really incredible achievements, logistical achievements are evacuation's. and those -- said that is proline number one reason that we don't celebrate this area in full force. >> the other x loughner side. about 8,000 americans were killed in action. >> but a 11,000 tiny and the prison ships. >> most of those are new york. 7,000 prisoners apparently perished. >> at think that to prison ships better off what is now the brooklyn navy yard, to prison ships have something like 11,000, it's an estimate. people bynum. and again, that points. they're not the people who you would necessarily build a giant memorial for singularly. but, yes, those prison ships, washington protested the malta the war. people on the ships were not being fed, barely being fed to my dying and the ships. and if you got off, if you were an off
, england and europe. and so the president ordered them built in 1940, but the navy, um, decided that that was probably not a good idea, so they convinced the president that the scarce resources that were available at that time would be better spent on destroyers. and i think that if, if you look at the historical record, you'll see that that probably was a mistake. .. it was built in the tampa shipyard. there were 563 destroyed air escorts built. seventeen shipyards all across the country. it actually came late in the game, like a lot of them. this is 1944. it did a few escort's back and forth across the atlantic. one interesting thing that the slater did do, the only nazi submarine, the only you-book captured by the americans and will work to was captured by destroyer escort. they get a treasure trove of material, conference of documents, actually a half a ton from this you -- u-boat 505. one of the torpedoes was loaded on to this letter and brought back to america for study along with the all important in the machine, and that was the codebreaking machine. and it actually was
in europe and things happening in other countries, to make the united states a place where people feel they can do business, we should take out this brinkmanship for their political games. there was an election on these issues. there was an election on rates. the president was clear on raising the rate and he won. democrats expanded in the senate. it's not like this is a new debate. >> we talk about how the business community was at odds with the campaign. in terms of preventing a debt ceiling showdown, it may be his ally. >> a former health care adviser to the romney campaign, david k. johnston and joan walsh thanks for joining us. >> understanding the tragedy might be impossible. why dry? after this. twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which i
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